domingo, 29 de novembro de 2009

K.C. Misra, "Understanding Mineral Deposits"

K.C. Misra, "Understanding Mineral Deposits"
Springer | 1999 | ISBN: 0045530092 | 864 pages | PDF | 50,1 MB

The challenge of finding new orebodies to satisfy the ever increasing demands for mineral commodities has to be met, in addition to improved techniques of exploration, mining, extraction, and management, by a better understanding of the geologic setting and genesis of the various classes of mineral deposits. A substantial part of the book is devoted to a discussion, with appropriate examples, of principles that govern the formation of mineral deposits and the various kinds of field and laboratory data that can be used to interpret their genesis. The rest of the book discusses the characteristics of selected classes of deposits, their relationship with the crustal evolution in space and time, and on the application of available data to the formulation of viable genetic models that provide the basis for exploration strategies. Audience: The book is intended as a text for an introductory course in economic geology at senior undergraduate and graduate levels, but it should also serve as a useful information resource for professional economic geologists.

Handbook of Paleoanthropology: Volumes 1-3: T. Hardt (Author), Winfried Henke (Editor), Ian Tattersall (Editor)

Paleoanthropology is perhaps the most multidisciplinary of all the sciences. Any complete account of the evolution and cultural and biological context of Homo sapiens must combine information from geology, paleoecology, primatology, evolutionary biology and a host of other fields. Above all, historical information needs to be combined with, and interpreted in the light of, what we know of the living world. Paleoanthropology is also an actively developing field in which much remains to be settled. The three volumes of this handbook bring together contributions by the world's leading specialists that reflect the broad spectrum of modern paleoanthropology, thus presenting an indispensable resource for both professionals and students alike. Volume 1 deals with principles, methods, and approaches. In recent years, enormous advances have been made in such areas as phylogenetic analysis, paleoecology and evolutionary theory and philosophy. The contributions in this first volume present the state of the art in these fields, provide succinct introductions to them and reflect the many ways in which they interact. As human beings are primates, Volume 2 is devoted to primate origins, evolution, behaviour, and adaptive variety. Its emphasis is on integration of fossil data with the vast amount that is now known of the behaviour and ecology of living primates in natural environments. Volume 3 deals with the fossil and molecular evidence for the evolution of Homo sapiens and its fossil relatives (the family Hominidae or subfamily Homininae, according to taste, a matter that we have left to the individual contributors).

Vol 1:Principles, Methods and Approaches
Vol 2:Primate Evolution and Human Origins
Vol 3:Phylogeny of Hominids
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Computers in Geology: 25 Years of Progress (Studies in Mathematical Geology)

This volume vividly demonstrates the importance and increasing breadth of quantitative methods in the earth sciences. With contributions from an international cast of leading practitioners, chapters cover a wide range of state-of-the-art methods and applications, including computer modeling and mapping techniques. Many chapters also contain reviews and extensive bibliographies which serve to make this an invaluable introduction to the entire field. In addition to its detailed presentations, the book includes chapters on the history of geomathematics and on R.G.V. Eigen, the "father" of mathematical geology. Written to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the International Association for Mathematical Geology, the book will be sought after by both practitioners and researchers in all branches of geology.