sexta-feira, 30 de dezembro de 2011

"Sedimentary Basins Evolution, Facies, and Sediment Budget" by Gerhard Einsele



"Sedimentary Basins Evolution, Facies, and Sediment Budget" by Gerhard Einsele
Sрringеr | 1992 | ISBN: 3540547436 0387547436 | 632 pages | PDF | 43 MB

This book provides an overview of all major topics in sedimentary geology. It is unique in its quantitative approach to denudation-accumulation systems and basin fillings, including dynamic aspects. The relationship between tectonism and basin evolution as well as the concepts of sequence cycle and event stratigraphy in various depositional environments are extensively discussed. 
 
Numerous, often composite figures, a well-structured text, brief summaries in boxes, and several examples from all continents make the book an invaluable source of information for students, researchers and professors in academia as well as for professionals in the oil industry.

Contents
Part I Types of Sedimentary Basins
1 Basin Classification and Depositlonal Environments
1.l Introduction
1.2 Tectonic Basin Classification
1.3 Pre-, Syn-, and Post-Depositional Basins.
1.4 Basin Morphology and Depositional Environments
Part II Depositional Systems and Facies Models
2 Continental Sediments
2.1 Glacial Deposits of Lowlands and Shallow Seas
2.1.1 Continental Glacial Deposits
2.1.2 Glaciomarinc Sediments
2.2 Fluvial Sediments, Alluvial Fans, and Fan Deltas
2.2.1 Bed Forms, Sedimentary Structures, and Facies Elements
2.2.2 Alluvial Fans and Fan Deltas
2.2.3 Various River Systems and Their Sediments
2.2.4 Large-Scale Lateral and Vertical Evolution of Fluvial Systems
2.3 Eolian Sediments
2.3.1 Introduction
2.3.2 Eolian Sands
2.3.4 Clay Dunes
2.3.5 Eolian Dust, Loess
2.4 Volcaniclastic Sediments (Tephra Deposits)
2.4.1 General Aspects and Terms
2.4.2 Tephra Deposits on Land and Below the Sea
2.4.3 Volcaniclastic Sediments in Basins of Various Tectonic Settings
2.4.4 Alteration, Diagenesis, and Metamorphism of Volcaniclastic Rocks
2.5 Lake Sediments
2.5.1 Different Lake Systems and Their Sediments.
2.5.2 Recent and Ancient Examples of Lake Sediments
2.5.3 Specific Features of Lakes and Lake Sediments
3 Coastal and Shallow Sea Sediments (Including Carbonates)
3.1 Beach and Shoreface Sediments
3.1.1 Coastal Processes, Beach and Shoreface Sands
3.1.2 Storms and Storm Deposits (Tempestites)
3.2 Sediments of Tidal Flats and Barrier-Island Complexes
3.2.1 Tidal-Influcnccd Environments and Sediments
3.2.2 Sediments of Barrier-Island Complexes
2.4.1 General Aspects and Terms
2.4.2 Tephra Deposits on Land and Below the Sea
2.4.3 Volcaniclastic Sediments in Basins of Various Tectonic Settings
2.4.4 Alteration, Diagenesis, and Metamorphism of Volcaniclastic Rocks
2.5 Lake Sediments
2.5.1 Different Lake Systems and Their Sediments
2.5.2 Recent and Ancient Examples of Lake Sediments
2.5.3 Specific Features of Lakes and Lake Sediments
3 Coastal and Shallow Sea Sediments (Including Carbonates)
3.1 Beach and Shoreface Sediments
3.1.1 Coastal Processes, Beach and Shoreface Sands
3.1.2 Storms and Storm Deposits (Tempestites)
3.2 Sediments of Tidal Flats and Barrier-Island Complexes
3.2.1 Tidal-Influcnccd Environments and Sediments
3.2.2 Sediments of Barrier-Island Complexes
6 Special Depositional Environments and Sediments
6.1 Green Marine Clays
6.2 Oolitic Ironstones
6.3 Red Beds
6.4 Marine Evaporites
6.4.1 Models for Evaporite Deposition
6.4.2 Sequences. Sedimentary Structures, and Sedimentation Kates
6.4.3 Diagenesis and Geochemical Characteristics of Evaporites
6.4.4 Salt Structures
6.5 Nonactualistic (Precambrian) Depositional Environments
6.5.1 The Evolution of the Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, and Climate
6.5.2 Precambrian Sediments
7 Depositional Rhythms and Cyclic Sequeaces
7.1 General Aspects.
7.2 Special Features and Examples of Rhythmic Bedding.
7.3 Depositional Cycles in Lakes. Fluvial and Deltaic Systems
7.3.1 Cyclic Sequences in Lakes
7.3.2 Sediment Successions in Fluvial and Deltaic Systems
7.4 Sea Level Changes and Sequence Stratigraphy
7.4.1 General Principles and Terms
7.4.2 Changes in Sea Level and Storm Wave Base in Shallow Basins
6 Special Depositional Environments and Sediments
6.1 Green Marine Clays
6.2 Oolitic Ironstones
6.3 Red Beds
6.4 Marine Evaporites
6.4.1 Models for Evaporite Deposition
6.4.2 Sequences. Sedimentary Structures, and Sedimentation Kates
6.4.3 Diagenesis and Geochemical Characteristics of Evaporites
6.4.4 Salt Structures
6.5 Nonactualistic (Precambrian) Depositional Environments
6.5.1 The Evolution of the Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, and Climate
6.5.2 Precambrian Sediments
7 Depositional Rhythms and Cyclic Sequeaces
7.1 General Aspects.
7.2 Special Features and Examples of Rhythmic Bedding.
7.3 Depositional Cycles in Lakes. Fluvial and Deltaic Systems
7.3.1 Cyclic Sequences in Lakes
7.3.2 Sediment Successions in Fluvial and Deltaic Systems
7.4 Sea Level Changes and Sequence Stratigraphy
7.4.1 General Principles and Terms
7.4.2 Changes in Sea Level and Storm Wave Base in Shallow Basins
10 Sedimentation Rates and Organic Matter in Various Depositional Environments
10.1 General Aspects
10.2 Average Sedimentation Rates
10.3 Production and Preservation of Organic Matter
10.3.1 General Aspects.
10.3.2 Organic Matter in the Oceans
10.3.3 Organic Matter Preservation and Black Shales
11 The Interplay Between Sediment Supply, Subsidence, and Basin Fill
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Simple Relationships Between Source Area on Land and Basin Fill
11.3 Different Modes of Basin Filling
11.4 Vertical and Lateral Facies Associations (Overview)
Part IV Basin Evolution
12 Basin Evolution and Sediments
12.1 Rift Basins
12.1.1 Rift Structures
12.1.2 Examples of Young Rift Zones
12.1.3 Sediments of Rift Basins
12.1.4 Transition from Rift Basins to Coniinental Margin Basins.
12.2 Coniinental Margin and Slope Basins
12.2.1 General Aspects
12.2.2 Sediment Successions of Continental Margin Basins
12.2.3 Sediment Successions on Continental Slopes
12.3 Intracratonic Basins Associated with Mega-Rifting
12.3.1 Permian to Mesozoic Basin Development in Europe (Overview)
12.3.2 Mesozoic Sediments Between the North Sea and the Western Tethys
12.4 Continental or Intracratonic Sag Basins
12.5 Deep-see Trenches, Forearc and Backarc Basins
12.5.1 General Features
12.5.2 Deep-Sea Trenches
12.5.3 Forearc Basins
12.5.4 Backarc Basins
12.5.5 Preservation and Recognition of Ancient Subduction-Related Basins.
12.6 Remnant and Foreland Basins
12.6.1 Remnant Basins with Flysch
12.6.2 Foreland Basins with Molasse
12.7 Pannonian-Type Basins
12.8 Pull-Apart Basins
12.9 Basin-Type Transitions (Polyhistory Basins)
Part V Diagenesis and Fluid Flow
13 Mechanical and Chemical Diagenesis
13.1 General Aspects of Mechanical and Chemical Diagenesis
13.2 Compaction, Compaction Flow, and Other Flow Mechanisms
13.3 Principles of Chemical Diagenesis
13.4 Thermal History of Sedimentary Basins and the Onset of Metamorphism.
13.5 Special Methods and Processes in Diagenesis
14 Hydrocarbons and Coal
14.1 Source Rocks, Kerogen Types, and Hydrocarbon Potential
14.2 Generation of Hydrocarbons
14.3 Examples of Hydrocarbon Habitats
14.4 Evolution of Coal
References
Subject Index



R. Gloaguen, "Growth and Collapse of the Tibetan Plateau - Special Publication 353 (Geological Society Special Publication)"



R. Gloaguen, "Growth and Collapse of the Tibetan Plateau - Special Publication 353 (Geological Society Special Publication)"
Publisher: Geological Society Of London | 2011 | ISBN: 1862393265 | PDF | 264 pages | 12.2 MB

Despite agreement on first-order features and mechanisms, critical aspects of the origin and evolution of the Tibetan Plateau, such as the exact timing and nature of collision, the initiation of plateau uplift, and the evolution of its height and width, are disputed, untested or unknown. This book gathers papers dealing with the growth and collapse of the Tibetan Plateau. The timing, the underlying mechanisms, their interactions and the induced surface shaping, contributing to the Tibetan Plateau evolution are tightly linked via coupled and feedback processes. We therefore present cross-disciplinary contributions which allow insight into the complex interactions between lithospheric dynamics, topography building, erosion, hydrological processes and atmospheric coupling. The book is structured in four parts: early processes in the plateau formation; recent growth of the Tibetan Plateau; mechanisms of plateau growth; and plateau uplift, surface processes and the monsoon.

The Geological Society of London

Founded in 1807, the Geological Society of London is the oldest geological society in the world, and one of the largest publishers in the Earth sciences.

The Society publishes a wide range of high-quality peer-reviewed titles for academics and professionals working in the geosciences, and enjoys an enviable international reputation for the quality of its work.

The many areas in which we publish in include:

-Petroleum geology
-Tectonics, structural geology and geodynamics
-Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology
-Volcanology, magmatic studies and geochemistry
-Remote sensing
-History of geology
-Regional geology guides

B. E. Leake, "Memoir 34 - The Life and Work of Professor J. W. Gregory FRS (1864-1932): Geologist, Writer and Explorer"



B. E. Leake, "Memoir 34 - The Life and Work of Professor J. W. Gregory FRS (1864-1932): Geologist, Writer and Explorer"
Publisher: Geological Society of London | 2011 | ISBN: 1862393230 | PDF | 232 pages | 10.7 MB

Gregory's remarkable career and his scientific work are detailed and critically assessed. Accounts of his heroic 1893 expedition to the Rift Valley (a term he coined) in Kenya (now the Gregory Rift), his first crossing of Spitzbergen, and his resignation as Leader of the first British Antarctic Expedition of 1901, when racing to the Pole under Scott became the priority, draw on unpublished letters. While in Melbourne he published on mining geology and a series of geography textbooks. His 1901 Lake Eyre expedition in Central Australia initiated the phrase 'The Dead Heart of Australia' and controversy over the source of artesian water. In the Chair of Geology in Glasgow from 1904, he built up the largest first-year geology class in the UK, over 400 students. He worked in every field of geology and every continent except Antarctica. He was also involved with the search for a 'homeland' for the Jews in Libya and Angola. He shrewdly realized that Wegener's Continental Drift Theory erroneously supposed that the Pacific Ocean was wider than now before the Atlantic opened. This led to his influential rejection of Continental Drift. He drowned in Peru traversing the Andes having published over 30 books and nearly 400 articles.

The Geological Society of London

Founded in 1807, the Geological Society of London is the oldest geological society in the world, and one of the largest publishers in the Earth sciences.

The Society publishes a wide range of high-quality peer-reviewed titles for academics and professionals working in the geosciences, and enjoys an enviable international reputation for the quality of its work.

The many areas in which we publish in include:

-Petroleum geology
-Tectonics, structural geology and geodynamics
-Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology
-Volcanology, magmatic studies and geochemistry
-Remote sensing
-History of geology
-Regional geology guides

Brigitte Markner-Jäger, "Technical English for Geosciences: A Text/Work Book"



Brigitte Markner-Jäger, "Technical English for Geosciences: A Text/Work Book"
Sp,..er | 2008 | ISBN: 3540686142 | 212 pages | PDF | 34 MB

The course book Technical English for Geosciences is a real gold mine for all – most especially students and lecturers – who need to enhance their command of the English language with the terminology of geosciences. Subjects from all branches and disciplines of geosciences are discussed: Applied Geology, Geotechnology/Geoengineering, Mineralogy, Hydrology, Mining and Rehabilitation, Meteorology, and Water and Waste Management – subjects which are closely related to Bachelor’s or Master’s degree studies. Texts are taken from various authentic material including advertisement brochures, scientific monographs or internet sources. Terminology is practiced through multiple tasks and interesting exercises. The book is meant for learning in classes as well as for self-study. A glossary and proposals for solutions are provided at the end of the book.

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Knut Bjorlykke, "Petroleum Geoscience: From Sedimentary Environments to Rock Physics"


Knut Bjorlykke, "Petroleum Geoscience: From Sedimentary Environments to Rock Physics"
Publisher: Springer | ISBN: 3642023312 | edition 2011 | PDF | 508 pages | 32.2 mb

Petroleum geoscience comprises those geoscientific disciplines which are of greatest significance for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas. These include petroleum geology, of which sedimentary geology is the main foundation along with the contextual and modifying principles of regional, tectonic and structural geology. Additionally, biostratigraphy and micropalaeontology, organic geochemistry, and geophysical exploration and production techniques are all important tools for petroleum geoscientists in the 21st century. This comprehensive textbook present an overview of petroleum geoscience for geologists destined for the petroleum industry. It should also be useful for students interested in environmental geology, engineering geology and other aspects of sedimentary geology

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Reed Wicander, James S. Monroe, "Historical Geology, 6 edition"



Reed Wicander, James S. Monroe, "Historical Geology, 6 edition"
Br,,ks C--e | 2009 | ISBN: 0495560073 | 444 pages | PDF | 60,3 MB

HISTORICAL GEOLOGY, Sixth Edition, presents a balanced overview of the geological and biological history of Earth as a continuum of interrelated events that reflect the underlying principles and processes that have shaped our planet. Students are taught the basic geologic principles as well as how scientists apply these principles to unravel Earth's history. Three major themes - time, evolutionary theory, and plate tectonics - are woven together throughout the book to help students link essential material and enhance their understanding of historical geology. The sixth edition has been thoroughly updated to include the formation of the Earth-Moon system, information about the evolution of populations as a whole, and coverage of climate change throughout the text, placing an emphasis on what we don't know within the historical geology field as compared to what we do know.
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